Larry's Short Stories

Red Stag in Patagonia

Brenda and I pose with this “decent” red stag, shot with my customized Remington 700 in 300 Win. Mag.
Brenda and I pose with this “decent” red stag, shot with my customized Remington 700 in 300 Win. Mag.

When planning a hunting trip, sometimes the focus is not so much about hunting, but just to have a good time, get to know the other members of your hunting party a little better and explore new parts of the world. Such was the focus of this hunt, and we got exactly what we bargained for – a grand experience in Patagonia. Planning for a trip like this is a lot of hard work; first comes “where” are we going, then “when” is the right time, and finally “who” will make up the group. Then, the really hard work of planning can begin, passports, airline tickets and gun permits – Brenda did most of this.
Our destination was the south end of Argentina, in South America – the Patagonia region. It was a three-leg flight: first from Kansas City, Missouri to Dallas, Texas, then an overnighter to Buenos Aires — and finally a small regional plane to San Martin, followed by a short drive to the ranch. Of course, we had to stop in Buenos Aires for one day, to visit the historic sites and the leather shops, before heading on south to the hunting area.
There were nine of us on this

Company CFO Linda Bounds joined us on this trip and shot her first wild hog, as well as a red stag.
Company CFO Linda Bounds joined us on this trip and shot her first wild hog, as well as a red stag.

trip – all MidwayUSA co-workers. Two had modest hunting experience, but the rest of us had been hunting for many years. Brenda and I had hunted red stag in Argentina a few years earlier, in the mountains a bit farther to the north. This was a guided 2 on 1 hunt and we spotted and stalked from pickup trucks in the mostly open and rolling foothills of the Andes mountains. It was a beautiful place, with visibility in
every direction.
Our primary quarry was red stag; a native of Europe that was introduced into Argentina in 1905. It was a short hunt, we sighted in on the 10th and flew out on the 14th - five short days, but all took nice red stag. A few hunters, who got their stags early, were also able to shoot pigs. Sara and Brenda did a little fly fishing, on the nearby river.
Food and beverage are always an important component of any hunting trip, but unfortunately not always worth a mention. It’s different in Argentina; in all our trips there, for big game or birds, our groups have always been pleased with the great Argentine beef (often cooked outside) and the fine red wines.

The fishing was pretty technical in the Chimehuin River, with fast water, slick rocks and lots of overhanging brush along the river. Daughter Sara caught several fish, but this brown trout was the best.
The fishing was pretty technical in the Chimehuin River, with fast water, slick rocks and lots of overhanging brush along the river. Daughter Sara caught several fish, but this brown trout was the best.
Larry's Short Stories